An Open Letter to Conservative Christian Parents from Your Liberal Children

 

To Our Parents,

We know you are saddened and confused by us seeming to leave behind the values you raised us with in exchange for ideals that run counter to the faith you prayed we’d hold most dear. It seems you are both worried about us and wondering where you went wrong.

We want you to know the faith you instilled in us is alive and well, and serving as the compass you taught us it should be.

This faith began with the idea that we are each created “fearfully and wonderfully” as unique individuals, intentionally, through an act of God’s will. Because of this, the sanctity of human life, each human life, is of utmost importance to God, and, therefore, to us. Through the doctrine of original sin, we learned our very nature was both tainted by and defined by sin, leaving all humanity equally depraved. In this sense, we are not better than nor worse than anyone else. We are just all “sinners.”

However, as we learned at a very young age, the story doesn’t end there, because inserted into this depravity is the unconditional love of God. “For God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten son.” When we were in the depth of pain, even suffering we created by our own sinful choices, God showed up, with something free, to bring us back into relationship with him. The answer, we learned, to brokenness is love. And, this love is for everyone: “red, and yellow, black and white.”

We learned about the life of Jesus on earth, specifically how he didn’t make sense to anyone religious, anyone who thought they could prove the certainty of their beliefs with evidence. We learned that in his Kingdom, everything is backwards, the last first, the weak strong, and the oppressed powerful. We noticed that of all the things Jesus spoke against, the only thing that made him literally turn tables in a temple was powerful people using religion as their excuse for exploiting those less powerful. In this moment, Jesus’ body joined in the “no” of his mind and heart.

Core to this beautiful redemption story is the idea of sacrifice, the notion that doing what is right and good is not always popular or self-preserving. The picture of Christ on the Cross, enduring unimaginable pain and humiliation he did not deserve, all to give humankind a great gift, is the most enduring symbol of the faith to which we still hold tight. Not only does it make possible eternity with God, it also tore the curtains and erased the barriers that existed not only between us and God but also between us and each other. Even the ones the ancient texts clearly said were “out” are now in.

From there, we were raised with a deep sense of responsibility that we would be held accountable to living a life worthy of that sacrifice. This meant standing up for our faith, even when it wasn’t popular, even when it cost us opportunities, relationships, and comfort. This meant resting on “do unto others” and “turn the other cheek” when we were hurt or treated unfairly. It meant following the basic rules of not taking what wasn’t ours, being willing to apologize and repent when we were wrong, telling the truth no matter what, prioritizing “the least of these” above ourselves, protecting the innocent, fighting for those who cannot fight for themselves (specifically the unborn), promoting the strength of the family unit, crossing the divides between us to become “Samaritans” in our own worlds, being willing to bring out into the light what hid in darkness, and most of all, following Christ’s example of sacrifice when given the opportunity to sacrifice in our own lives.

We were taught that this road would be uncomfortable, and that we were called to it anyway.

This, you told us, was Biblical.

As it now turns out, we believe it all.

We believe that exploiting others by taking what is theirs, making it ours, and using it to our benefit, is not right. And we believe that when people do that, they need to repent and repair. That is why we stand with the Native American people, recognizing that we have built our lives and our wealth on their land. We acknowledge White settlers may not have survived our transition to this land in the first place had it not been for the generosity of the Native people. We responded to their help by using our power to disempower them, stealing their very way of life and the culture that had held and protected them for so long. We believe in our responsibly to repent and to stop.  We know we cannot change what our ancestors did. We also know we have a responsibility to stand up for the Native American people today to preserve what little restoration they have been given. For this reason, we stand with Standing Rock and all the other Native tribes to preserve their remaining power, their culture, and their traditions, including their burial grounds. We follow the example of Jesus. Though he had power, he did not use it. Instead, he humbled himself to the service of others. In our culture at this juncture, White Americans have the most power. We chose to use it as Jesus used His, in service instead of exploitation.

We believe that we really are made in the image of God, all of us, meaning that we get a fuller picture of God’s imagine by truly “seeing” not only those who are like us, but more importantly, those who are different. We do believe that we are all “precious in his sight” and we seek to understand what is precious to God about our brothers and sisters of different races, ethnicities, cultures, and religions. We recognize that our country built our wealth on the backs of minorities and now uses that same wealth to prevent them from building the same life members of the majority can build. We realize you do not agree, that these are dynamics you do not see, and we validate they are not dynamics that are obvious in the worlds you have built for yourselves and the ones you have raised us in. Your inability to see these dynamics do not make them any less real to those affected by them or any less important for us to fight against. We cannot continue to know God at deeper and deeper levels until we are willing to embrace the parts of himself he has chosen to show through those we do not yet understand. Our faith also requires us to stand up and fight with and for our minority friends when they are treated in any way less than what they deserve as a fellow Beloved of the Most-High God, even when that happens in church. When they are dismissed, marginalized, ignored, and silenced, we will continue to hear them, champion them, and pay attention. We are committed to letting our minority friends define their experience for us instead of presuming to define it for them. As a result, we will not water down the impact of the message Black Lives Matter by hijacking it to talk about other groups. Instead, we will hear and learn about the experience of our Black brothers and sisters rather than challenging it.

We believe and seek to treat others how we would want to be treated. Many of us have our own children now. We understand the importance of medical care for those tender and sometimes scary moments young parents experience. We know the need parents feel to care for their innocent and vulnerable children so they are protected, happy, and free of trauma. We feel in our bones the fire that would come out if anyone ever tried to harm them or take away the opportunities we’ve worked so hard to provide them, and we are keenly aware that it is our privilege that eases our fears of this ever actually happening. So, when we hear about mothers and fathers in other countries, whose options are so limited that they bring their child on a lifeboat knowing his or her body could wash up on shore instead of make it across, we stand with those refugees and fight for them to have the same opportunities we would fight for our own children to have. We know that we are just as responsible for those children as we are for our own, that what we do for our neighbor, we do for Jesus himself. We know that even if our convenience or our own wealth is affected, we are responsible to fight for them. We choose to elevate their lives above our own sense of safety, because we do believe in the sanctity of each of their individual lives, and we know their lives are in danger. We will continue to fight for America to welcome them with open arms and to invoke the creativity that has always defined our nation to come up with ways to address the financial implications.

It is that same commitment to preserving life that fuels our fight for gun control, more peaceful ways of solving world conflict, sex education that is focused not only on abstinence but on prevention of unwanted pregnancies through access to birth control, the funding of programs that support young families who chose to carry initially unwanted pregnancies to full term, and alternative options to capital punishment. We really do believe that life matters, and for us, that issue extends so far beyond the unborn.

Just as Christ died for us just because we are humans and not because we were good enough, we too will offer our love and resources not just do those who “deserve” it but to those who are undocumented and incarcerated. We will also work to reform both the immigration system and the prison system, which has become a modern manifestation of segregation.

In the culture of Jesus’ day, strong hierarchy existed. Owners over slaves. Men over women. Jew over Gentiles. Jesus made it very clear that in his Kingdom, power structures were not welcome. We recognize the movement of the early church toward this goal, and we join their momentum by rejecting any theology in which men and women do not share the same power, recognizing the heart of God is the shared power of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Following that model of mutual submission and mutual power, we continue to fight for the rights of women, including the equalizing of the wages of women, specifically women of color, with what men make to do the same job. Furthermore, we will stay committed to the causes of refugees, immigrants, and minorities, recognizing how many of them are women who face complex challenges as a result of multi-faceted disempowerment. We also reject the over-empowered stereotype of masculinity in the church knowing that quiet men, artistic men, and cautious men are also strong.

We understand these conversations are unknown territory for you, and that sometimes you are scared and confused by them. If you are wondering how you can interact with us around these topics, please keep the following in mind.

  1. We have spent our entire lives learning the intricate nuances of your views, not just the broad strokes. Please take the time to approach our views with genuine curiosity and learn about them too. For a while, this will require you to do much more listening than talking.
  2. Please understand we live in a different world than you do. The gay community, the immigrant community, the minority communities, are tangible to us. They are represented by faces and stories of people in our actual lives. They are not a concept we debate; they are people we love. When you are talking about “them,” please talk as respectfully about these communities as you would about your own friends.
  3. Please don’t be scared for us, or let your fear convince you to try to sway us back to your side. What we need is more respectful and honest dialogue between those who hold diverse views. These diverse views are part of the fabric of not only our country, but our church. They are an important part of finding balance amongst ourselves, and erasing different views should not be the goal. When you approach us with a clear agenda to change our views back to the ones you feel more comfortable with, we can tell that is about alleviating your own anxiety, and we shy away from participating.
  4. Don’t call us names or label us. Don’t assume our intentions. We are still the same kids you raised, and if you want to know what drives and motivates our beliefs and actions, just ask us, and be ready to listen to the response.

Also, if we seem abrasive or disrespectful, that is not our intention, though we understand the impact is still just as painful. Please be patient with us in our confusion. Just as you are working through your own anxiety about our new paths, we are working through the disillusionment of seeing you leave behind some of these core tenants of your faith in ways that, to us, seem both selfish and financially motivated, something we never thought we would witness coming from the very people who taught us about selflessness and sacrifice.

We are confident there is a way to find common ground and common language. We are also confident it will be messy and require lots of effort. We welcome the investment of our time and energy toward these important conversations, starting in our families with those we love most, including you.

Sincerely,

Your Children

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37 thoughts on “An Open Letter to Conservative Christian Parents from Your Liberal Children

  1. Thank you for this letter to us conservative parents. It is very good. However, by default, it is one-sided. I greatly appreciate your writing, and I hope that you will take my comments to be of the same loving nature that you wrote. In order to differentiate, i start and end my comments with an asterisk, and all capitals. Please do not take this as ‘shouting’.

    To Our Parents,

    We know you are saddened and confused by us seeming to leave behind the values you raised us with in exchange for ideals that run counter to the faith you prayed we’d hold most dear. It seems you are both worried about us and wondering where you went wrong.

    We want you to know the faith you instilled in us is alive and well, and serving as the compass you taught us it should be.

    This faith began with the idea that we are each created “fearfully and wonderfully” as unique individuals, intentionally, through an act of God’s will. Because of this, the sanctity of human life, each human life, is of utmost importance to God, and, therefore, to us. Through the doctrine of original sin, we learned our very nature was both tainted by and defined by sin, leaving all humanity equally depraved. In this sense, we are not better than nor worse than anyone else. We are just all “sinners.”

    However, as we learned at a very young age, the story doesn’t end there, because inserted into this depravity is the unconditional love of God. “For God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten son.” When we were in the depth of pain, even suffering we created by our own sinful choices, God showed up, with something free, to bring us back into relationship with him. The answer, we learned, to brokenness is love. And, this love is for everyone: “red, and yellow, black and white.”

    We learned about the life of Jesus on earth, specifically how he didn’t make sense to anyone religious, anyone who thought they could prove the certainty of their beliefs with evidence. We learned that in his Kingdom, everything is backwards, the last first, the weak strong, and the oppressed powerful. We noticed that of all the things Jesus spoke against, the only thing that made him literally turn tables in a temple was powerful people using religion as their excuse for exploiting those less powerful. In this moment, Jesus’ body joined in the “no” of his mind and heart.

    Core to this beautiful redemption story is the idea of sacrifice, the notion that doing what is right and good is not always popular or self-preserving. The picture of Christ on the Cross, enduring unimaginable pain and humiliation he did not deserve, all to give humankind a great gift, is the most enduring symbol of the faith to which we still hold tight. Not only does it make possible eternity with God, it also tore the curtains and erased the barriers that existed not only between us and God but also between us and each other. Even the ones the ancient texts clearly said were “out” are now in.

    *THUS FAR, WE CAN ONLY SAY “AMEN”. WE TOO BELIEVE THIS, AND CONTINUALLY SEEK TO ACT FOLLOWING IT*

    From there, we were raised with a deep sense of responsibility that we would be held accountable to living a life worthy of that sacrifice. This meant standing up for our faith, even when it wasn’t popular, even when it cost us opportunities, relationships, and comfort. This meant resting on “do unto others” and “turn the other cheek” when we were hurt or treated unfairly. It meant following the basic rules of not taking what wasn’t ours, being willing to apologize and repent when we were wrong, telling the truth no matter what, prioritizing “the least of these” above ourselves, protecting the innocent, fighting for those who cannot fight for themselves (specifically the unborn), promoting the strength of the family unit, crossing the divides between us to become “Samaritans” in our own worlds, being willing to bring out into the light what hid in darkness, and most of all, following Christ’s example of sacrifice when given the opportunity to sacrifice in our own lives.

    *WHILE WE COMPLETELY AGREE WHAT YOU HAVE SAID HERE, WE ARE DEEPLY PAINED BY WHAT WE HAVE CONTINUALLY WITNESSED OCCURRING BY YOU AND YOUR FRIENDS. YOU SPEAK OF FIGHTING FOR THE UNBORN, YET EVEN THOSE OF YOUR AGE WHO STATE YOU FOLLOW CHRIST ARE LARGELY SUPPORTIVE OF KILLING OF THE UNBORN. YOU SAY YOU PROMOTE THE STRENGTH OF THE FAMILY UNIT, YET YOU WHOLEHEARTEDLY ENDORSE ANY AND ALL FORMS OF ‘FAMILY’, INCLUDING SINGLE PARENT, SAME SEX PARENTS, AND CHILD PARENTS. (LET’S HAVE A DISCUSSION ON WHAT EACH OF US SEES AS ‘THE STRENGTH OF THE FAMILY UNIT’).

    We were taught that this road would be uncomfortable, and that we were called to it anyway.

    This, you told us, was Biblical.

    As it now turns out, we believe it all.

    We believe that exploiting others by taking what is theirs, making it ours, and using it to our benefit, is not right. And we believe that when people do that, they need to repent and repair. That is why we stand with the Native American people, recognizing that we have built our lives and our wealth on their land. We acknowledge White settlers may not have survived our transition to this land in the first place had it not been for the generosity of the Native people. We responded to their help by using our power to disempower them, stealing their very way of life and the culture that had held and protected them for so long. We believe in our responsibly to repent and to stop. We know we cannot change what our ancestors did. We also know we have a responsibility to stand up for the Native American people today to preserve what little restoration they have been given. For this reason, we stand with Standing Rock and all the other Native tribes to preserve their remaining power, their culture, and their traditions, including their burial grounds. We follow the example of Jesus. Though he had power, he did not use it. Instead, he humbled himself to the service of others. In our culture at this juncture, White Americans have the most power. We chose to use it as Jesus used His, in service instead of exploitation.

    *AMEN. WE DO NOT DISAGREE WITH THIS. WE HAVE FOUGHT OUR LIVES FOR PROTECTING AND HELPING THE DISADVANTAGED. YOU SAY ‘TAKING WHAT IS THEIRS, MAKING IT OURS, AND USING IT TO OUR BENEFIT IS NOT RIGHT”. AGAIN, TOTAL AGREEMENT. BUT WHEN YOU SEEK THE GOVERNMENT TO TAKE EVER INCREASING AMOUNTS OF THE FRUITS OF OUR HARD LABOR, AND WASTING IT THROUGH SELFISH BUREAUCRACY, OR ON THINGS WE STRONGLY CONSIDER IMMORAL, OR THROUGH MAKING ENTIRE SUBCULTURES DEFENDANT UPON IT, RECOGNIZE THAT WE SEE THIS AS BEING WRONG ALSO.*

    We believe that we really are made in the image of God, all of us, meaning that we get a fuller picture of God’s imagine by truly “seeing” not only those who are like us, but more importantly, those who are different. We do believe that we are all “precious in his sight” and we seek to understand what is precious to God about our brothers and sisters of different races, ethnicities, cultures, and religions. We recognize that our country built our wealth on the backs of minorities and now uses that same wealth to prevent them from building the same life members of the majority can build. We realize you do not agree, that these are dynamics you do not see, and we validate they are not dynamics that are obvious in the worlds you have built for yourselves and the ones you have raised us in. Your inability to see these dynamics do not make them any less real to those affected by them or any less important for us to fight against. We cannot continue to know God at deeper and deeper levels until we are willing to embrace the parts of himself he has chosen to show through those we do not yet understand. Our faith also requires us to stand up and fight with and for our minority friends when they are treated in any way less than what they deserve as a fellow Beloved of the Most-High God, even when that happens in church. When they are dismissed, marginalized, ignored, and silenced, we will continue to hear them, champion them, and pay attention. We are committed to letting our minority friends define their experience for us instead of presuming to define it for them. As a result, we will not water down the impact of the message Black Lives Matter by hijacking it to talk about other groups. Instead, we will hear and learn about the experience of our Black brothers and sisters rather than challenging it.

    *YOU ARE CORRECT….WE DO NOT AGREE THAT WE (OR OUR COUNTRY)…..’NOW USES THAT SAME WEALTH TO PREVENT THEM FROM BUILDING OUR WEALTH MEMBERS OF THE MAJORITY CAN BUILD’.

    WE ARE THE ONES WHO VOTED FOR AND IMPLEMENTED THE GREAT SOCIAL EXPERIMENTS STARTING UNDER LBJ. WE ARE THE ONES WHO FOUGHT FOR AND IMPLEMENTED AFFIRMATIVE ACTION. AND WE ARE THE ONES WHO READILY AGREED TO GIVE UP GREAT AMOUNTS OF OUR EARNINGS OVER THE YEARS TO SUPPORT THESE MINORITIES SO THEY COULD GET STARTED (RATHER THAN SPEND MORE ON YOU CHILDREN OR MAKE OUR RETIREMENTS BETTER.) BECAUSE MANY TOOK ADVANTAGE OF THESE OPPORTUNITIES PRESENTED, TODAY YOU SEE MANY PROFESSIONALS OF ALL RACES, AS WELL AS MILLIONS WHO HAVE ATTAINED MIDDLE CLASS OR BETTER. WE NOW WORK WITH, LIVE WITH, AND SOCIALIZE WITH PEOPLE OF ALL RACES, CULTURES AND RELIGIONS (AS IT SHOULD BE!!)

    BUT THERE ALSO EXISTS A SUBCULTURE, LARGELY OF LONGTIME AFRICAN-AMERICAN CITIZENS, WHO WE HAVE ENABLED TO NOT TAKE ANY PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY FOR THEIR LIVES AND FUTURE. A SUBCULTURE THAT DOES NOT BELIEVE THEY SHOULD WORK. DO NOT BELIEVE EDUCATION IS IMPORTANT. DOES NOT BELIEVE THEY SHOULD BE OUT OF HIGH SCHOOL BEFORE HAVING CHILDREN. WHERE OVER 95% OF THIS SUBCULTURE IS SINGLE PARENT. THIS SUBCULTURE RECEIVES OVER 70% OF THE GOVERNMENT SOCIAL PROGRAM BENEFITS. OVER 85% OF THE PRIVATE CHARITY DONATIONS. AND THEY ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR THE MAJORITY OF CRIME, HIGH INCARCERATION RATES, MASSIVE DRUG ABUSE, AND HORRENDOUS ABUSE OF WOMEN AND CHILDREN. THEY ARE THE ONES DOING THE KILLING IN OUR CHICAGO. THESE ARE ALSO THE ONES PROTESTING THE MOST. SHOUTING BLACK LIVES MATTER THE MOST. .

    WE NEED TO CONTINUE TO REACH OUT AND TO FIND WAYS TO HELP THESE CHILDREN OF GOD HELP THEMSELVES. BUT IT IS ULTIMATELY THEIR RESPONSIBILITY. THIS IS NOT RACIAL (CHECK THE STATS ON RECENT AFRICAN IMMIGRANTS). THIS IS NOT BIGOTRY, RACISM, OR ANY OF THE OTHER NAMES YOU HAVE CALLED US BY. THIS IS A REALITY WE HAVE SEEN FIRST HAND. LIKELY OUR BIGGEST SIN IN THIS AREA WAS TO SHELTER YOU FROM IT AS YOU WERE GROWING UP.

    LOOK AT THE PEOPLE VOLUNTEERING IN MOST OF THE CHARITIES TRYING TO HELP THIS SUBCULTURE. YOU WILL FIND THAT THEY ARE OVERWHELMINGLY OF OUR GENERATION, AND ARE OVERWHELMING CONSERVATIVE. WE HAVE FOUND THAT THE MAJORITY OF PROGRESSIVES, AND OF YOUR GENERATION, WOULD RATHER HAVE THE GOVERNMENT DO SOMETHING THAN TO GET INVOLVED YOURSELVES (EXCEPT FOR MARCHING).

    IS THERE MORE TO BE DONE? DEFINITELY. DID WE MAKE MISTAKES? YES. BUT PLEASE, AS YOU LECTURE US, RECOGNIZE THAT WE HAVE ALREADY INVESTED MUCH IN OUR LIVES TO CHANGE THESE THINGS.*

    We believe and seek to treat others how we would want to be treated. Many of us have our own children now. We understand the importance of medical care for those tender and sometimes scary moments young parents experience. We know the need parents feel to care for their innocent and vulnerable children so they are protected, happy, and free of trauma. We feel in our bones the fire that would come out if anyone ever tried to harm them or take away the opportunities we’ve worked so hard to provide them, and we are keenly aware that it is our privilege that eases our fears of this ever actually happening. So, when we hear about mothers and fathers in other countries, whose options are so limited that they bring their child on a lifeboat knowing his or her body could wash up on shore instead of make it across, we stand with those refugees and fight for them to have the same opportunities we would fight for our own children to have. We know that we are just as responsible for those children as we are for our own, that what we do for our neighbor, we do for Jesus himself. We know that even if our convenience or our own wealth is affected, we are responsible to fight for them. We choose to elevate their lives above our own sense of safety, because we do believe in the sanctity of each of their individual lives, and we know their lives are in danger. We will continue to fight for America to welcome them with open arms and to invoke the creativity that has always defined our nation to come up with ways to address the financial implications.

    *LOOK THE HISTORY OF OUR GENERATION AND YOUR GRANDPARENTS GENERATION OF STANDING UP FOR THE WORLD’S MISTREATED. NEVER IN THE HISTORY OF THE WORLD HAS A GENERATION OF A COUNTRY DONE SO MUCH! THE PLIGHT OF REFUGES NOW IS HORRENDOUS, AND WE MUST HELP THEM.

    BUT NEVER FORGET….WE DIDN’T WANT THESE REFUGEES TO EVEN EXIST. WE ARE THE ONES WHO WANTED TO KEEP TROOPS IN IRAQ (ALA JAPAN AND GERMANY) TO GIVE THEM THE SPACE THAT THEY COULD DEVELOP THEIR COUNTRY. WE ARE THE ONES WHO ARGUED WE MUST DO SOMETHING WHEN ATROCITIES WERE HAPPENING IN THEIR COUNTRIES. WE ARE THE ONES WHO ARGUED AGAINST CREATING THE ARAB SPRING THEN ABANDONING THOSE WHO FOUGHT FOR IT. IT WAS YOUR GENERATION, SUPPORTING THE ‘NOT OUR PROBLEM’ POLICIES OF OBAMA AND CLINTON, THAT CREATED THESE REFUGEES TO BEGIN WITH. THEY DON’T WANT TO COME TO THE WEST…..THEY WANT TO LIVE IN THEIR OWN COUNTRIES, WITH PEACE AND DIGNITY. YOU AND YOUR LEADERS ABANDONED THEM, UNLIKE THE PEOPLES WE SUPPORTED THROUGH THE LAST GENERATIONS, AND NOW YOU HAVE THIS MASSIVE REFUGEE CRISIS.*

    It is that same commitment to preserving life that fuels our fight for gun control, more peaceful ways of solving world conflict, sex education that is focused not only on abstinence but on prevention of unwanted pregnancies through access to birth control, the funding of programs that support young families who chose to carry initially unwanted pregnancies to full term, and alternative options to capital punishment. We really do believe that life matters, and for us, that issue extends so far beyond the unborn.

    Just as Christ died for us just because we are humans and not because we were good enough, we too will offer our love and resources not just do those who “deserve” it but to those who are undocumented and incarcerated. We will also work to reform both the immigration system and the prison system, which has become a modern manifestation of segregation.

    In the culture of Jesus’ day, strong hierarchy existed. Owners over slaves. Men over women. Jew over Gentiles. Jesus made it very clear that in his Kingdom, power structures were not welcome. We recognize the movement of the early church toward this goal, and we join their momentum by rejecting any theology in which men and women do not share the same power, recognizing the heart of God is the shared power of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Following that model of mutual submission and mutual power, we continue to fight for the rights of women, including the equalizing of the wages of women, specifically women of color, with what men make to do the same job. Furthermore, we will stay committed to the causes of refugees, immigrants, and minorities, recognizing how many of them are women who face complex challenges as a result of multi-faceted disempowerment. We also reject the over-empowered stereotype of masculinity in the church knowing that quiet men, artistic men, and cautious men are also strong.

    We understand these conversations are unknown territory for you, and that sometimes you are scared and confused by them. If you are wondering how you can interact with us around these topics, please keep the following in mind.

    We have spent our entire lives learning the intricate nuances of your views, not just the broad strokes. Please take the time to approach our views with genuine curiosity and learn about them too. For a while, this will require you to do much more listening than talking.
    Please understand we live in a different world than you do. The gay community, the immigrant community, the minority communities, are tangible to us. They are represented by faces and stories of people in our actual lives. They are not a concept we debate; they are people we love. When you are talking about “them,” please talk as respectfully about these communities as you would about your own friends.
    Please don’t be scared for us, or let your fear convince you to try to sway us back to your side. What we need is more respectful and honest dialogue between those who hold diverse views. These diverse views are part of the fabric of not only our country, but our church. They are an important part of finding balance amongst ourselves, and erasing different views should not be the goal. When you approach us with a clear agenda to change our views back to the ones you feel more comfortable with, we can tell that is about alleviating your own anxiety, and we shy away from participating.
    Don’t call us names or label us. Don’t assume our intentions. We are still the same kids you raised, and if you want to know what drives and motivates our beliefs and actions, just ask us, and be ready to listen to the response.
    Also, if we seem abrasive or disrespectful, that is not our intention, though we understand the impact is still just as painful. Please be patient with us in our confusion. Just as you are working through your own anxiety about our new paths, we are working through the disillusionment of seeing you leave behind some of these core tenants of your faith in ways that, to us, seem both selfish and financially motivated, something we never thought we would witness coming from the very people who taught us about selflessness and sacrifice.

    We are confident there is a way to find common ground and common language. We are also confident it will be messy and require lots of effort. We welcome the investment of our time and energy toward these important conversations, starting in our families with those we love most, including you.

    *PLEASE UNDERSTAND WE HAD THESE SAME DISCUSSIONS WITH OUR PARENTS. WE TOO SOUGHT TO FIX ALL THE ILLS OF THE WORLD. WE TOO HAVE DEVOTED OUR LIVES TO FOLLOWING CHRIST AND BEING JESUS FOR THE WORLD. WE ALSO HAVE AGED ENOUGH TO RECOGNIZE THAT MANY OF OUR THOUGHTS WHEN WE WERE YOUNGER DON’T WORK, AND HAVE FOUGHT FOR NEW WAYS TO ACCOMPLISH THE GOALS. PLEASE GRANT OUR BELIEFS AND ACTIONS TO HAVE AT LEAST EQUAL STANDING TO YOURS.

    FINALLY, AND MOST IMPORTANTLY, RECOGNIZE THAT WHEN JESUS TALKS IN MATTHEW ABOUT TAKING CARE OF THE ELDERLY, THE SICK, THE HUNGRY, THE POOR, THE NEEDY OF ALL TYPES, HE IS NOT ADDRESSING THE GOVERNMENT. HE IS ADDRESSING US. WHEN WE GET TO HEAVEN, JESUS ISN’T GOING TO CARE ONE BIT ABOUT WHICH POLITICAL PARTY WE VOTED FOR OR WHAT POLICY WE SOUGHT TO HAVE THE GOVERNMENT ESTABLISH. HE IS GOING TO ASK YOU ABOUT THAT OLD LADY DOWN THE STREET. THE IMMIGRANTS LIVING IN YOUR CITY. THE HOMELESS IN YOUR CITY. HAVE YOU PERSONALLY GONE OUT TO CARE FOR THEM? HAVE YOU GOTTEN YOURSELF ‘DIRTY’? HAVE YOU COMMITTED LARGE SUMS OF YOUR OWN MONEY TO HELP THEM? OR HAVE YOU ARGUED FOR YOUR GOVERNMENT TO DO IT. THIS IS WHAT JESUS TOLD US TO DO….NOT TO GO AND CHANGE ROME, BUT TO LOVE YOUR NEIGHBOR AS YOURSELF.*

    Sincerely,

    Your Children

    *PLEASE READ MY COMMENTS AND TAKE THEM TO HEART, AS I HAVE TAKEN YOURS. THEN, RATHER THAN WRITE A BLOG AND FEEL GOOD ABOUT IT, COME AND VISIT ME, AND LET’S HAVE A REAL DISCUSSION.

    LOVE YOU!!!”

    Liked by 2 people

    1. John, Thanks for taking the time to reply. I really appreciate your more long-term perspective about some of these issues, and I think it is necessary to blend the short- and long-term to find common ground. I also really appreciate your reminder to get our hands dirty. I see my generation doing that, and I’m glad you do too. It’s going to take all of us!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. You are welcome. I only ask that as you find your views on some things different from ours, you recognize that our views are based on a lot of deep thought and prayer also. Not better or worse, but valid. Too much of what I hear from younger people today is that they have thought about ‘these things’ and the older generation never did.

        A sign of true maturity is when you have close friends who have different views on things. Unfortunately, in this day of pick-your-news-source and the echo chamber of social media, it is becoming too rare. I hope your great piece here helps to break down some of those barriers.

        Love where you are coming from! Please, keep blogging! And may God bless you and your family.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. So true. We are all listening to our own voices and voices like ours and we are not in real conversation with those who hold diverse viewpoints! I don’t post often, but I hope you’ll stick around when I do!

        Liked by 1 person

    2. Hi John and Deb – John I don’t know you but I think many of your comments seem to make one assumption: the civil rights movement is over and “the minorities” should be grateful for what your generation did. Though I agree that my parents generation did (and do) work towards greater equity across racial groups in this country, I don’t think the work is over. I also do not think (as someone who is involved in the BLM movement and has friends who organize for them) believe the BLM movement is some “subgroup” of non-working, whiny group of black folks. That is an assumption I see many white people (of many age groups) make based on stereotypes portrayed in movies and the media but not grounded in fact. I would encourage you to reach out to local BLM folks where you live and have coffee. See what’s up and why they still organize. I’m not sure a post from me via a blog will change your mind but I would encourage your engagement to seek answers to questions you seem to have (or assumptions you seem to make) as opposed to continuing believing them to be true or factual. I am an educator so I often believe our best education is the one we engage in on our own through relationships we build with those who are different from us or have a different perspective. I suspect you might respond to this reply with all the ways you know or are in relationship with black folks but I would ask you to resist that urge and instead reach out to those black folks who are still in the midst of a civil rights movement and are seeking to continue the march of your generation.

      Liked by 2 people

    3. John, I am probably closer to your age, I am both an adult child of Conservative parents and the mother of adult Bernie supporters, but I resonate a lot more with the original blog and I want to take a moment to explain why.

      I still identify as Conservative because, even though not everyone realizes it, “Conservative” speaks to how much you align with the core values taught by your guiding document and I have not changed – I still uphold the Bible’s teachings (which this article addresses beautifully) & I still uphold the Constitution and it’s ideals. That is conservative. It is because of my conservative position that I find myself with little to nothing in common with the Republican Party … which is no longer conservative and in a desire to not be progressive has become extremely regressive and destructive. I believe what I do because I still agree with these guiding principles! To emphasize these statements, and give some perspective, I am a Pastor and Messianic Rabbi who teaches God’s Word and my first election involved voting for Ronald Reagan. These are not just ideas or ideals to me — they are the meat and bones of my life and work.

      When I was younger I cringed when I would pick up on the subtle inconsistencies between the faith that was being taught me and the choices I saw made around me. “Everyone is equal at the foot of the cross — but not at the voting booth.” “God loves the world! But I really don’t like that person over there.” “We should take care of everyone . . . . until we think we’ve taken care of them enough and then they better figure out a way to pull themselves up by their bootstraps and start taking care of themselves!” You’ve much more eloquently expressed all of these ideas, but I want you to know how they sound to my ears, no matter how eloquent you are able to be.

      As a child I was aware of the gap between stated belief and reality but I am of a personality that assumed the adults knew more than I did — there must be a reason — some day I would understand. I am also of a personality that when that some day never came I had to ultimately call out the hypocrisy for what it is. And I’ve been meditating on what might be the cause of that hypocrisy. I’ve got a few ideas.

      A lot of Western independent Puritan work ethic permeates our lives in ways that we are blind to unless we stop and try to look. Jesus said the poor would always be with us, but our culture says that when we help someone they should figure out how to take care of themselves going forward. Now, I agree with you that our government –or, more accurately, politicians who have wanted to keep an underclass of citizens who were reliant on them so that they could keep getting their votes– has infantilized large segments of our population. I am all for reform that would stop that — but not at the expense of the people who wake up today, born long after it started, subjected to years of systemic abuse within our culture.

      As for families and what makes them, and what to do about the unborn, or even how to help them, my experience is that those from our generation talk “about” people in different situations while those of the younger generations, and where I find myself, well, we’re out talking “to” people. One of my favorite classes at Fuller seminary was by Dr. Ray Anderson and asked the question what do you do when your belief about something runs head first into the reality of someone else’s life. Some will dig in more, but I have found God softened my heart immensely and challenged my stereotypes. In fact, most of the time when someone from our generation meets a real person in a real situation the response is to say, “Well, you’re the exception.” But they aren’t! Everyone is the exception and stereotypes are ignorant balls of hateful ideas.

      Why do I support families of all different flavors? Because people are existing in families of all different flavors. They are already forming those families — I can either judge, reject and ignore them, or I can embrace them, where they are, and love them in their situation. That is my only choice. It is not up to me what family they form when they come to me fully formed.

      In fact, no where does God grant me the right to grant permission for what anyone does in their lives. I have a choice every time I’m faced with someone and the choices they are making — love them or judge them. God is very clear on which I’m to do and on which is stepping into God’s territory (uninvited). I have very strong convictions for my own life — I study and I embrace and I hold dear the things that I believe and I know what I have imparted to my children and those whom God has granted me even the slightest influence in their lives. I also accept the reality that I do not have the right to attempt to impose my values on anyone else — especially not from a position of power and control dynamic which is oppressive and not empowering.

      I would suggest that the current generation of young people is poised for such a time as this and we need to put a lot more effort into listening and learning from their perspective. You are right that we have more years of experience and a much more seasoned perspective — that doesn’t make us more right. Perhaps if we were right we wouldn’t be handing over the messes we are to this generation. And since we are handing it over to them, and it’s the only life they get, I strongly suggest we consider their fresh, new, not-yet-exhausted ideas for how to address it — especially since the current approach is to ask the people who need help what they actually need instead of trying to decide for them and impose on them and then get angry when it doesn’t work.

      What people need to understand is that “I do not accept their” really means “I do not accept them” and that is a dangerous and judgmental place to be. First, we aren’t in a position to accept or not accept anything about other people. It’s not up to us and it’s not our place. There is also this false idea that loving someone right where they are means you’re somehow high-fiving their sin — that’s ridiculous! unless you are literally high-fiving them for their sin you’re not! just love them. Accept them. Embrace them. Be there for them. Be ready to rejoice at the small baby steps towards health in whatever area of life it is. If they are willing to be around you with whatever your sin struggle is, maybe be grateful!

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    4. John, may I ask, where did you get your statistics? You wrote: “WHERE OVER 95% OF THIS SUBCULTURE IS SINGLE PARENT. THIS SUBCULTURE RECEIVES OVER 70% OF THE GOVERNMENT SOCIAL PROGRAM BENEFITS. OVER 85% OF THE PRIVATE CHARITY DONATIONS. AND THEY ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR THE MAJORITY OF CRIME, HIGH INCARCERATION RATES, MASSIVE DRUG ABUSE, AND HORRENDOUS ABUSE OF WOMEN AND CHILDREN. THEY ARE THE ONES DOING THE KILLING IN OUR CHICAGO. THESE ARE ALSO THE ONES PROTESTING THE MOST. SHOUTING BLACK LIVES MATTER THE MOST. .”

      I would hate to think that you were bearing false witness in the name of your Christian faith, but I tried to verify your statistics and I could not find any sources that back up your numbers. I appreciate the time you took to reply to each of the author’s points, but you discredit yourself when you post untrue numbers, and you only deepen the problem of racism in America when you defame African Americans using statements that aren’t true. Here are some credible statistics that I found that counter your arguments:
      http://www.statisticbrain.com/welfare-statistics/
      https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2014/09/30/white-people-are-more-likely-to-deal-drugs-but-black-people-are-more-likely-to-get-arrested-for-it/?utm_term=.dd6d7757bb25
      http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/statements/2013/jul/29/don-lemon/cnns-don-lemon-says-more-72-percent-african-americ/
      http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/statements/2016/feb/26/hillary-clinton/hillary-clinton-says-blacks-more-likely-be-arreste/
      Are there high rates of childbirth out of wedlock in the African American community? Yes, but not nearly as high as your comment implied. The issues there are complicated and are linked to high incarceration rates – which, as one of my links speaks to – are in part due to the fact that African American men are incarcerated at greater rates for the SAME CRIMES that white men commit. (See link above.)
      Please check your sources before disparaging other people.

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  2. Honor your Father and Mother and your days will be long in the land. Blaming us your parents for what goes on in other countries is unfair. Try being thankful and grateful for what we did to sacrifice for you. There is nothing wrong with parents raising their kids to love God and to love their neighbor. At least we did better than our parents. Provoke ones other to love and good works !

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    1. Ann, did you even read this post? She was explicitly THANKING parents for the solid foundation they gave us, the sacrifices they made and acknowledging the love and care they put into our spiritual formation…

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Ann, this is why the blog was written- because when young people try to talk to their parents they are too often shut down with blame and shame alongside a heaping dose of guilt. I know because I am both an adult daughter of conservative parents and a mother of adult Bernie supporters. Of course my mother accused me of really being a millennial the other day and I took that as a compliment (I don’t think it was intended that way 😉 )

      Your immediate response was to defend yourself. And then to move straight away into ‘shoulding’. That means you didn’t read to listen, hear and understand.

      This blog post was so respectful, so honoring, so kind. I encourage you to try again. Read it with a desire to understand. It is a good thing.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. “We learned about the life of Jesus on earth, specifically how he didn’t make sense to anyone religious, anyone who thought they could prove the certainty of their beliefs with evidence.”

    As a person born and raised into a throughly Christian family and taught the Bible all my life, I can’t remember ever reading anything any where in the Bible about Jesus not making sense to “anyone religious,… who thought they could prove the certainty of their beliefs with evidence.”

    In fact, if anything, many of the great heroes of the faith in the Bible seemed very certain they could prove the certainty of their beliefs with evidence! People from Moses, who proved Yahweh’s existence and might to the Egyptians and Pharoah with the evidence of powerful miracles, all the way to Paul, who cited over 200 people who saw Jesus after he was crucified as evidence of Jesus’ resurrection (1 Corinthian 15:3-7). Evidence bolstering the certainty of one’s beliefs seems actually to be a common thing in the Bible.

    “That is why we stand with the Native American people, recognizing that we have built our lives and our wealth on their land.”

    It’s very true that European Caucasians were responsible for the wiping out of numerous Native American tribes, and built their settlements and cities on what had been formerly Native American land. But not all Caucasians were like that. Some tried very hard to live at peace with the Natives already there. Not all “white men” of the past can automatically be judged guilty of “using [their] power to disempower them, stealing [the Native Americans] very way of life and the culture that had held and protected them for so long.”

    “For this reason, we stand with Standing Rock and all the other Native tribes to preserve their remaining power, their culture, and their traditions, including their burial grounds.”

    From what I’ve heard, the much-maligned Dakota pipeline isn’t even going to pass through Native American land, and the many other tribes who met with the company to discuss the pipeline didn’t have any problems with it.

    “…we will not water down the impact of the message Black Lives Matter by hijacking it to talk about other groups. Instead, we will hear and learn about the experience of our Black brothers and sisters rather than challenging it.”

    The Black Lives Matter movement started when a thuggish young black man, big and strong enough to commit strong-arm robbery – that is, VIOLENT “un-armed” robbery! – attacked a police man, tried to take the officer’s gun, got shot for his assault attempts, made one last attempt to fool the officer and charged him again, and was killed. That is case indicated by the forensic evidence and by numerous witnesses (including minority witnesses) whose stories didn’t change after media reports or repeated questioning. The death of this man, killed in self-defense by the officer, is still frequently cited by the media as the start of BLM. Because of this, I have no respect for the BLM movement and give it no credibility, and am suspicious of those part of it and tend to have little respect for them. What what I can tell, there are many who distrust the BLM movement for the same reasons. When you begin a protest movement spurred by anger over the justified killing of a criminal, not only are you starting off on the wrong foot; you are shooting your movement in the same foot you’re trying to get it started on.

    “Following that model of mutual submission and mutual power, we continue to fight for the rights of women…”

    Speaking as a woman, I tend to be highly suspicious of most modern “fights for the rights of women”, because so often the fighters seem convinced that one of the main rights of women is the “right” to kill her child in the womb. This suspicion has only been strengthened by the recent of actions of those claiming to stand up for women, to exclude women who specifically include the unborn in their fight for rights. Surely there is no minority more in need of someone to speak up for them, than someone who is too young to even speak, no one who’s needs are more ignored by the majority than those ignored because they are invisible, hidden within the flesh of their mothers, no one more marginalized than those whose right to life is so often completely forgotten in the struggle to uphold the women’s right to choose. You say that life matters to you, but it “extends so far beyond the unborn.” Indeed, to us it looks like it often extends so far beyond them, that you have left the unborn behind altogether.

    “Please understand we live in a different world than you do. The gay community, the immigrant community, the minority communities, are tangible to us. They are represented by faces and stories of people in our actual lives. They are not a concept we debate; they are people we love. When you are talking about “them,” please talk as respectfully about these communities as you would about your own friends.”

    In turn, please try to understand that the world you live in may actually not be all that different from the world we live in. Many of us also know people we love who are part of the gay community, the illegal alien community (which is what I assume you mean by the immigrant community, because that is the one liberals usually mean when they say “immigrant”) as well as the frequently forgotten legal immigrant community, and the minority community. Shoot, some of us are members of these communities! And many of us hold our seemingly clueless conservative views BECAUSE of our personal knowledge of and experience with the members of said communities. We may not be as all ignorant as you may think. And you may not know as much more than us as you think you do.

    Sincerely,
    One among the children of Conservatives, who never became a Liberal.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I want to begin by saying that I am a white Christian women who takes my convictions very seriously. That being said it is extremely interesting to me that you contradict yourself in the same breath. You begin by arguing the unjust judgement of the white man taking the land of the Native American with saying “not all Caucasians are like that” and yet you so strongly believe that the BLM movement is all the same filled with aggression and destruction. That is giving an excuse to your people and not allowing that same justification for another group. I also believe the author was very clear with an opinon of pro life and education to promote that choice, so there was an obvious clarification of beliefs. I hope that this letter creates a healthy and honest discussion of that clarification of beliefs. We can still be christians and believe in certain “liberal” views without agreeing with them all. We all are still learning and striving to do what we believe the Lord has instructed and planned for our lives.

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      1. Absolutely. We need to get beyond the binary of liberal and conservative. I am so of both. Part of my point is that so many conservatives see my liberal views on some issues and define me based on them.

        Liked by 1 person

    2. About Dakota Access, the pipeline is going under a mile wide reservoir that is on land promised to the Dakota and Lakota people via two treaties, of 1851 and 1868. The US is inviolation of those treaties. The reservoir is close to the reservation and would poison the source of their drinking water in the event of leaks.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. As a Catholic, I find this to be incredibly patronizing and disrespectful to the older generation. You cannot simultaneously forbid the integration of Church and state but guilt Christians into a certain way of thinking concerning politics based on their beliefs.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m sorry to hear it came across as patronizing to some. That was certainly not my intention but it’s clear you are not the only one who felt hat way. I wanted to state my case strongly and clearly without apologizing for it.

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      1. Deb, accusations that words are “patronizing” is a Patriarchal attempt to silence anyone (especially women) that the person doesn’t agree with and wants others to ignore. If something is dismissed with the correct words it signals others of a similar mindset that they can be free to dismiss them or not waste their time.

        I did not find you patronizing at all. I saw the love and care with which you crafted your response and I agree with so very much of what you said. Please do not be intimidated by the bullies who don’t want you to continue to find and reform your voice. If they can get you to stop speaking now you will not go on to challenge them in mightier and stronger ways in the future. That only benefits them — not you, not God and not the Kingdom. Keep speaking!

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      2. Crystal, thanks for all your encouragement and all your thoughts. So validating and thought-provoking. I don’t write often, but I hope you’ll continue to join the conversation when I do!!

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  5. Don’t actually send this to your parents. They’ll deny everything and gaslight you. It’s not worth the pain. That’s what people do when presented with their own wrongs. It’s the same reason most therapists don’t recommend confronting parents about how they abused you when you were a kid. It’ll put you through unnecessary extra trauma, create bigger rifts in the relationship, and it won’t fix or reconcile anything or make you feel better (speaking from actual experience, too). If your parents actually cared how people other than them think or see the world, they would have actually asked you and tried to learn from you – their own children – by now. If your family was an actual safe space for being open and honest with your parents about who you are and what you believe and how you’ve changed, you wouldn’t need this letter because this conversation would have actually already taken place between you and them in a natural, organic way that was safe and welcoming.
    The best thing you can do is seek therapy with a professional, work toward acceptance within yourself with your own past and family, and find a way to move forward in a way that is healthy and positive for you and your future, despite your past or current relationship woes with your own family. This may mean removing ties between you and your family if they are too toxic to be kept in your life. This may mean accepting pieces of your family this are good and healthy and shutting out those parts that are toxic. You have to find the balance that is best for you. This is something a therapist can help you with (speaking from experience).
    If you feel confident that you can actually sit your parents down and go through something like this letter with them, then go for it. But for most of you, it most likely won’t work, and you’ll just put yourself through extra, unnecessary trauma. If you have any doubt that your parents would react to a letter like this well, trust your intuition. It will probably go badly.
    Religious abuse is a real thing (and it often includes emotional and verbal abuse, so be aware of those too). For many of us who left our conservative Christian upbringing, you have to acknowledge this is possibly what you experienced as a child. Treat the religious abuse you were possibly raised under as any other abuse, and seek professional help for how to deal with it and to make yourself better. And as I’ve already mentioned, confronting your abusers about their abuse (sounds harsh, but this might be the reality of what your conservative religious upbringing actually was – speaking from experience) is largely advised against by therapists. Find a professional therapist who can help you find real healing. If they advise confrontation with your parents at any point, doing it with the support and advice of a therapist is a much better way to go about it. Trust me.
    Wherever you are in the journey, take care of you. You deserve it.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I completely understand where this is coming from. In a day and age where our parents are seemingly brain washed by media to fear anything that they don’t personally expierence (refugees, immigrants, people of other races than white, the BLM movement) and whole heartedly root for a president who openly disregards women’s rights (among MANY other things); we are scared. It’s hard to live in a time when you deeply disagree with your parent(s). It scares me and this letter explains much of what goes through my head. And if you feel offended by it, maybe it’s meant for you to hear. It’s simply asking us to open our hearts to actively hear the word of God. And the keep hearing it.

    We will never love “enough” people or give to “enough” causes. Our work on this Earth is never done. We can’t forget that. Just because we have helped someone in need it doesn’t end the calling. Following Jesus fully means living a life of sacrifice for ALL of life. We don’t get to choose to stop loving any group of people because we have lived them enough. Even if you disagree with their beliefs, choices, political views. You don’t have be their best friend, and arguably probably shouldn’t. However, friendship and showing the love that Jesus calls us to are not always the same. Some of us see our parents walking away from love and choosing fear to drive their life choices. Choices that have an impact on us too. Which drives us to want them to understand what we understand.

    Despite all of this, in choosing love I will never have this conversation with my parents. (I’m still very thankful that you wrote it) I know them too well, they will not accept these things. Instead I must learn how to live my life as an example of love. How can I LOVE my neighbor. How can I show love to my fellow sisters of the world. How can I love the broken and the needy? How can I show the world that love can cast out fear? That is my task. Not to convince anyone with words that I am right, but to show them by my actions that I really believe in the things that I use words to explain.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. I’m one of the parents and I admit that I did fit the category of conservative parents you are addressing. I have changed my views significantly, growing as I believe I see truth more clearly. My children, who I highly respect, have helped me learn. I am eternally grateful to them! I probably agree with you 95%. 🙂 God bless you, Millennials!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Deb, I really appreciated this post! And I totally agree that we do need “more respectful and honest dialogue between those who hold diverse views”. This holds true beyond age or generational lines. I’m a Gen-Xer (the ‘parent’ generation) but I often find myself wanting to say many of the things you’ve articulated here, and to let people know that just because my faith looks different these days, it’s not because I’ve rejected Jesus or become a “heretic”. In actual fact, my faith has “served as a compass”, and has allowed me to keep journeying without getting lost 🙂

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    1. Hi! Thanks for sharing! I have heard from a lot of the “parent” generation who are also resonating. Part of what this post has shown me is that God is moving in his Church, across generational lines, to help us re-evaluate who we were taught He is and who we are supposed to be in the world!

      Liked by 1 person

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